Shock Therapy™

Microbiotic Rebirth™

  • • Promotes a Lean Bodytype

  • • Supports Digestive Health

  • • Reduces Inflammation

  • • Enhances Wellbeing

There are trillions of bacteria, living and breeding inside your body, right now. You need some of them to survive, but many of them hate you. For most people, due to genetics and/or diet, the evil ones have gotten the upper hand, attacking you with not only fat gain, but whole body inflammation accompanied by damage to insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular and digestive health, the immune system, and even your skin and brain. Shock Treatment™ combines 5 potent, natural antibiotics to seek out and destroy them, freeing the kingdom of your gut to be repopulated with loyal, benevolent bacterial citizens.

 

 

Shock Therapy™
Microbiotic Rebirth


Gut Feelings

There are trillions of bacteria, living and breeding inside your body, right now. Gross, right. The gut and its microbiome are essentially a massive endocrine organ, controlling and influencing your entire body and brain. You need some of them to survive, but many of them hate you.

For most people, due to genetics and/or diet, the evil ones have gotten the upper hand, attacking you not only with fat gain, but also with whole body inflammation accompanied by damage to insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular and digestive health, the immune system, and even your skin and brain. And, given that all of these trillions of bacteria that call your gut “home” originally came from outside your body – and entered without your permission – it is by far the most important organ in which we can take steps to manipulate and regain control.

Shock Treatment™ is the first step in the process of making yourself king or queen of your own castle. It combines 5 potent, natural antibacterials to seek out and destroy these invaders, freeing your gut kingdom to be repopulated with loyal, benevolent bacterial citizens.

It will ameliorate symptoms, while preparing the gut for a permanent fix, with special emphasis on a lean, healthy body. Be nice to your gut. You’ll thank us later.

 

Deus Vult!

 

 

The Gut-Wrenching Truth

 

The Western lifestyle (including diet, lack of exercise, and alcohol use) leads to an imbalance of the bacterial composition of the gut. This results in the excess production of inflammatory signals, such as Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which escape the gut and enter the rest of your body. This leads to general digestive issues and inflammatory bowel syndromes like IBS. While fixing digestive disorders will come along for the ride, our primary focus is going to be on body composition and metabolic health. In other words, we want to make you leaner, protect against diabetes, and help keep you from having a heart attack or stroke.

LPS causes an increase in digestion speed, which leads to less nutrient absorption and feedback signals that tell the brain that it is time to stop eating. But, in the colon, speed is decreased which results in a greater total utilization of caloric energy from your food.

In other words, your brain tells you to keep eating and this leads to excessive fat accumulation from harvesting more calories. This aggravates the cycle further, as overeating and increased adiposity are inflammatory. So, what you have is more inflammation, more dysfunction, greater food intake, greater extraction of food, more fat accumulation, and REPEAT!

The carnage does not end here. Along with this inflammatory state is a disruption in the intestinal barrier. Intestinal permeability is increased and these inflammatory agents spill out. This is often called a “leaky gut”. The biggest culprit here is, once again, LPS.

This goes in conjunction with decrease in activity of brake signals such as short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), PPAR-alpha, and AMPK that act as anti-inflammatories and protect intestinal barrier function.

Once LPS escapes, it is active in the body and brain, just as in the intestine. In the fat tissue, this leads to fat storage. In the brain, it increases appetite, hunger, and food intake. It does so by decreasing both insulin and leptin insensitivity, peripherally and centrally, via Toll-like Receptor-4 (TLR4).  At this point, your body fat thermostat is wrecked, your ability to control food intake is gone, and you are a fat storing machine.

It is important to note, this low-level but constant systemic inflammation, PRECEDES insulin/leptin resistance and obesity. Elevated LPS levels, which occur during a Western-style and high-fat diet, initiate all of this.

More bad news:  atherosclerosis, heart disease, and stroke are promoted by these same inflammatory pathways. Combined with the increased body fat and insulin resistance, you officially have the perfect ingredients for the dreaded Metabolic Syndrome.

Obviously, this is not what you want your body doing to itself. It is not what you want it doing to you. It is not what you want it doing to your life.

And, it is just a bunch of microscopic bacteria causing all of this devastation. They need to go.

 

 

Probiotically Speaking

The most well-known, commercial probiotics are Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. They are also among the most common in the body, along with several other really interesting ones which are not commercially available, but we can manipulate with supplementation.  Find out more in the SupraBiotic™ and Primer™ write-ups.

Unfortunately, Lactobacillus belong to the Firmicutes phylum which is associated with weight gain and obesity. Just a 20% increase in Firmicutes with an equal decrease in Bacteroides results in an increased energy harvest of 150 calories per day in humans. That is equal to 15lbs of fat per year!  Modern food processing and the Western style diet promote these negative changes in microbial proportions. Thus, one can plainly see why it can be so difficult to get lean, as well as how easily obesity has become an epidemic.

In addition, probiotic treatment with several Lactobacillus species are directly associated with weight gain, body mass index, obesity, and Type-2 diabetes. They don’t tell you that on the label.

More powerful evidence of the profound effect of the microbiota on body weight and metabolism come from studies on fecal transfer.  And, yes, that is exactly what it sounds like – transferring poop from one subject’s intestine to another’s. In twins, transfer of an obese microbiota to lean mice was accompanied by an increase in fat cell formation, fat storage, bodyweight, fat mass, feelings of hunger, food consumption, and a dysbiotic alteration of the Firmicutes:Bacteroides ratio to reflect that of the obese model.  On the other side of the coin, transferring the intestinal microbiota from lean donors to obese does the opposite – it fixes all of these things.

Obviously, while it highlights the science, doing a fecal transfer is not terribly practical, appetizing, or readily available. Fortunately, there is good news. Although several species and strains of Lactobacillus promote weight gain, several protect against it. Furthermore, Bifidobacterium research shows only positive effects to a rather remarkable extent. We can manipulate levels of the good bacteria that are not commercially available, as detailed in the SupraBiotic™ and Primer™ write-ups.

Now, let’s get rid of the bad bacteria already inside you.

Shock Therapy™ Ingredients

Anti-Bacterial:

Tyrosol

Potent antibacterial, tailored for the gut

Quorum Sensing: Detects and responds to an increase in bacteria growth and density

Anti-Virulent: Inhibits the production of molecules that aid in colonization of host by pathogenic bacteria

Synergistic with other natural anti-bacterial compounds

Effective over a wide range of bacterial strains

 

 

L-Menthol

Very potent and effective against a wide array of bacteria

Disrupts bacterial membrane structure and function, basically making their insides fall out

Renders the bacteria vulnerable to other antibiotics, for a synergistic effect

 

Curcumin

Similar antibacterial potency as Tyrosol

Inhibits formation of biofilm, the protective shelter required for bacterial growth and survival

Disrupts bacterial cytokinesis, the process by which bacteria reproduce

 

Hyperforin

Extremely potent, with efficacy specific to the gut due to pharmacokinetics

Effective on wide range of bacteria

Stimulates the body’s natural host defense reactions

Eliminates bacterial breakdown products that would otherwise promote virulence

 

Zingerone

Complementary and synergistic with the other anti-bacterials

Interferes with several processes of bacterial growth and colonization

Inhibits formation of biofilm, the protective shelter required for bacterial growth and survival

Quorum Sensing: Detects and responds to an increase bacteria growth and density

Anti-Virulent: Inhibits the production of molecules that aid in colonization of host by pathogenic bacteria

Decreases minimum inhibitory concentrations of other anti-bacterials by 2 to 8-fold

 

All in all, Shock Therapy™ gives you 5 highly effective natural anti-bacterials, working synergistically through nearly every mechanism possible. Invasive, enemy combatant bacteria do not have a chance.

 

But, just as antibiotics do not get rid of an infection on the first day, they won’t destroy the bad bacteria in your gut immediately. Not to worry, the key ingredients in Shock Therapy™ provide immediate relief and begin healing the gut while the anti-bacterials are getting your renegade microbiota under control.

 

Immediate Action:

Ginsenosides

Adaptogen: Regularizes bodily functions, relieves ailments resulting from physiological stress, and creates balance and homeostasis

Potent, widespread anti-inflammatory

Specifically blocks LPS-induced inflammatory pathways

 

Zingerone

 

Anti-inflammatory

 

Inhibits the all-important LPS

 

Directly inhibits Toll-like Receptor-4, which links LPS inflammation with reduced insulin and leptin sensitivity

 

Potent at PPAR-alpha and AMPK comparable to pharmaceutical fibrates, counteracting LPS

 

Hyperforin

Super potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant

Suppresses inflammatory prostaglandin PGE(2) biosynthesis better than prescription NSAID indomethacin

Inhibits inflammatory 5-lipoxygenase end product formation comparably to the research standard 5-LO inhibitor zileuton.

Suppressed inflammatory COX-1 end product, 12(S)-hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid, formation with 3-fold more potency than aspirin, while being 18-fold more potent on 5-LO

100 times more potent antioxidant activity than N-acetyl cysteine

Curcumin

Anti-inflammatory action through AMPK  

400 times as potent at AMPK as metformin, a Type-2 diabetes medication with the well-known side-effect of fat loss

Protects against LPS-induced inflammation and tissue injury

It reduces the levels of Toll-like Receptor-4 (the insulin and leptin sensitivity killer)

 

Conclusion

Shock Therapy™ -- a first of its kind product which aggressively attacks the genesis of microbiotic dysfunction, including digestive health, metabolic health, and body composition, while promptly and effectively addressing and repairing avenues where this dysfunction manifests.

What to expect: you will have immediate relief of symptoms as well as steady restoration of broken systems, while the bacterial culprits are destroyed, paving the way for SupraBiotic™ and Primer™ to completely transform your gut, your body, and your health.

 

There are trillions of bacteria, living and breeding inside your body, right now. You need some of them to survive, but many of them hate you. For most people, due to genetics and/or diet, the evil ones have gotten the upper hand, attacking you with not only fat gain, but whole body inflammation accompanied by damage to insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular and digestive health, the immune system, and even your skin and brain. Shock Treatment™ combines 5 potent, natural antibiotics to seek out and destroy them, freeing the kingdom of your gut to be repopulated with loyal, benevolent bacterial citizens.

Currently, probiotics are mostly thought of and used in relation to a healthy digestive system (reducing upset stomach, gas and bloating, diarrhea, and IBS type symptoms) and the immune system (coughs, colds, and general sinus and respiratory health). While they certainly are indeed useful for such applications, the ramifications of an unhealthy gut and microbiota go far, far beyond that.

The gut and its microbiome are essentially a massive endocrine organ, controlling and influencing basically your entire body and brain. And, given that all of the trillions of bacteria that call it home originally came from outside your body – and entered without your permission – it is by far the most important organ in which we can take steps to manipulate and take back control.

We will first look at some basic science and data on how this all works. Then, we will look at studies that have shown alterations in the microbiotic make-up of the gut, and the correlations they display in health and disease, suboptimal and optimal fitness, and just general things that everyone would consider part of good or bad life outcomes.

It is a massive subject, far too much to discuss in complete depth, here, so we’ll do our best to keep it as short and sweet as possible while still giving you enough background in this field to understand the shocking reality, scope, and importance of this microscopic invasion.

Subsequently, we will get down to business and specifically get into the science of Shock Treatment™, the first step in the process of making yourself king or queen of your own castle, again. We’ll show you how it can immediately ameliorate symptoms, while preparing the gut for a permanent fix, with special emphasis on a lean, healthy body.

Deus Vult!

It basically works like this. The Western lifestyle, including diet, lack of exercise, and alcohol use (and, in all likelihood, genetics, though the data just isn’t there, yet) leads to an imbalance of the bacterial composition of the gut (1,2). This results in the excess production and release of inflammatory signals, such as Lipopolysaccharide, TNF-alpha, interleukins, and prostaglandins, which subsequently escape the gut and enter the rest of your body (3).

Though, they all contribute to the pathologies we will cover in various ways, it is Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that we will focus on the most. Within the gut, this leads to the general digestive issues and inflammatory bowel syndromes like IBS and colitis that you have commonly known probiotics as being used to alleviate (4).

While fixing digestive disorders will come along for the ride, our primary focus is going to be on body composition and metabolic health. In other words, we want to make you leaner, protect against diabetes, and help keep you from having a heart attack or stroke. However, there really is so much more to it than that, as a few quotes from the literature aptly demonstrate:

Changes in the composition of the gut microbiota (dysbiosis) may be associated with several clinical conditions, including obesity and metabolic diseases, autoimmune diseases and allergy, acute and chronic intestinal inflammation, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)…” (5)

In this milieu… disturbance of the gut microbiota balance and the intestinal barrier permeability is a potential triggering factor for systemic inflammation in the onset and progression of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.” (6)

Through these varied mechanisms, gut microbes shape the architecture of sleep and stress reactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. They influence memory, mood, and cognition and are clinically and therapeutically relevant to a range of disorders, including alcoholism, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and restless legs syndrome… Nutritional tools for altering the gut microbiome therapeutically include changes in diet, probiotics, and prebiotics.” (7)

As you can see, alterations in the microbiota can affect basically everything, but that there is also hope for change.

Getting back to the gut and body composition, the aforementioned Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) leads to overactivation of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) within the gut, which causes an increase in intestinal motility (speed of food going through) in the proximal parts of the intestine. This leads to less absorption of nutrient feedback signals that tell the brain you are well fed, and that it is time to stop eating (8). Concurrent with this is an increase in transit time in the colon, which results in a greater total harvest of caloric energy from your food (9, 10).

In other words, the signal your brain is getting is that you are not getting enough food, while you are actually extracting more calories from what you eat. This not only directly leads to more fat accumulation from harvesting more calories, it lends itself to over-eating. This aggravates the cycle further, as overeating and increased adiposity are themselves inflammatory. So, what you have is more inflammation, more dysfunction, greater food intake, greater extraction of food, more fat accumulation, then REPEAT!

The carnage does not even end here. Along with this inflammatory state is a disruption in the intestinal barrier. Intestinal permeability is increased and these inflammatory agents spill out systemically. This is often called a “leaky gut”. This results in a low-level inflammatory state in the entire body. The biggest culprit here is, once again, LPS (11).

LPS activates CB1 receptors in the body and brain, just as in the intestine. In the fat tissue, this leads to activation of PPAR-gamma, and an upregulation of triglyceride synthesis, fat cell formation, and fat storage (12). In the brain, activation of CB1 increases orexegenic pathways, thus increasing appetite, hunger, and ultimately, food intake (13). This should not much as much of a surprise considering “the munchies” that accompany intake of famous cannabinoid receptor agonist, marijuana.

And, LPS is not done yet, not at all. It also activates Toll-like Receptor 4 which, along with other inflammatory signals (TNF-alpha, interleukins), promotes both insulin and leptin insensitivity, peripherally and centrally (14, 15). At this point, your adipostat (the thermostat for your body fat level) is wrecked. Your ability to control food intake is gone, and you are a fat storing machine. Obviously, this is not what you want your body doing to itself. It is not what you want it doing to you. It is not what you want it doing to your life.

Oh, and to top it off, atherosclerosis, heart disease, and stroke are promoted by these same inflammatory pathways. Combined with the increased body fat and insulin resistance, you officially have all of the perfect ingredients for the dreaded Metabolic Syndrome (16, 17).

And, it is just a bunch of microscopic bacteria that call your gut “home” causing all of this devastation.

The most well-known genera of bacteria in commercial probiotics are Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. They are also among the most common in the body, along with several other ones which are not commercially available, but which we can manipulate with supplementation. We will talk about these in length in the SupraBiotic™ and Primer™ write-ups.

Unfortunately, Lactobacillus belong to the Firmicutes phylum which has been found to be associated with weight gain and obesity (18-20). Just a 20% increase in Firmicutes (which Lactobacillus is usually the primary genus) with an equal decrease in Bacteroides results in an increased energy harvest of 150 calories per day in humans (21). That is equal to 15lbs of fat per year! The Western style diet promotes these negative changes in microbial proportions (22). Thus, one can plainly see why it can be so difficult to get lean, as well as how easily obesity has become an epidemic.

Interestingly, smoking cessation produces the same negative changes in bacterial composition, while gastric bypass surgery improves it (23-24). The well-known effects on weight with both of these further highlights the negative body compositional effects of this intestinal dysbiosis.

In addition, probiotic treatment with several Lactobacillus species that are in a great number of commercial formulations, including Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Lactobacillus ingluviei , have been directly associated with weight gain and obesity (25). Type-2 diabetics had significantly more Lactobacillus, with L. acidophilus being particularly bad in this regard (26). Further, L. Reuteria and L. Sakei have been found to be positively associated with obesity and body mass index (27-29). They probably don’t tell you that on the label.

More powerful evidence of the profound effect of the microbiota on body weight and metabolism come from studies on “fecal transfer”. And, yes, that is exactly what it sounds like – transferring poop from one subject’s intestine to another’s.

In twins, transfer of an obese microbiota to lean mice was accompanied by an increase in bodyweight, fat mass, and a dysbiotic alteration of the Firmicutes:Bacteroides ratio to reflect that of the obese model (30). A similar transfer replicated the obese phenotype with increased weight gain, lipogenesis, adipogenesis, overeating, and lower satiety, as well as inflammation and hyperglycemia in formerly lean, healthy subjects (31, 32).

On the other side of the coin, transferring the intestinal microbiota from lean donors increases insulin sensitivity in individuals with metabolic syndrome, as well as reversing obesity and gastrointestinal issues (33). It also reduced markers of metabolic syndrome, inflammation, and oxidative stress in animals challenged with high-fructose diets (34).

Obviously, while it highlights the science, doing a fecal transfer is not terribly practical, appetizing, or readily available — unless maybe you are in California.

Fortunately, there is good news. While several species and strains of Lactobacillus have been found to promote weight gain, several have also been found to protect against it. And, of course, we only used the good ones. Furthermore, Bifidobacterium research has shown only positive effects to a rather remarkable extent. And, as mentioned, we can also manipulate levels of the good bacteria that are not commercially available, as we will detail in the SupraBiotic™ and Primer™ write-ups.

Right now, let’s get to talking about how we can get rid of the bad bacteria already inside you.

Anti-Bacterial:

Tyrosol
Tyrosol is one of the major components of virgin olive oil. In addition to being delicious, virgin olive oil is well known as being healthy – and, Tyrosol is one of the big reasons why. For our purposes, its potent antimicrobial activity, particularly against pathogenic and otherwise unwanted bacteria, is of primary importance.

At just 10uM, Tyrosol produced 50% inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Perhaps more importantly, it is quorum sensing (which means it notices and responds to an increase in growth and density of bacteria), and it inhibits the production of virulence factors (molecules that aid in colonization of host by pathogenic bacteria). It did not affect the bacterial wall, as many natural anti-bacterials do (35). This differing mechanism is likely why it was found to be synergistic with a number of other natural anti-bacterial compounds (36).

Tyrosol has been found to possess anti-bacterial action as potent as synthetic commercial disinfectants (37). Maybe more impressive, it is as potent as several pharmaceutical antibiotics such as gentamicin, amikacin, and ciprofloxacin (38). Finally, it has displayed efficacy over a very wide range of bacterial strains, which is perfect given that there are 1000s of strains in the gut (39).

L-Menthol
Menthol is best known for its use in cold and nasal relief products, as well as muscle balms. It has that icy, minty smell.

It shows very robust antibacterial activity, being more effective than pharmaceutical antibiotic streptomycin against a wide array of bacteria (40). In fact, it is almost twice as potent as streptomycin against many of them (41).

Its antimicrobial activity appears to be mostly due to the ability to disrupt bacterial membrane structure and function (42). The mechanism being a perturbation of the lipid fraction of the microorganism’s plasma membrane, resulting in increased permeability and leakage of intracellular materials out of the cell (43). Basically, it cuts them open, and their guts fall out. This membrane disruption also renders the bacteria vulnerable to other antibiotics, for a synergistic effect (44).

 

Curcumin
Circumin is the spicy component of mustard seed as well as turmeric. It displays interesting mechanisms of action as well as strong potency at around 7-60 ug/ml on a number of bacterial species (45). It was effective at 20ug/ml with several additional species, inhibiting biofilm formation by 80% at this concentration (46). Most interestingly, it also disrupts bacterial cytokinesis, the physical process of cell division, in the low micromolar range, with a dissociation constant of just 7.3+/-1.8 uM (47). In other words, it keeps them from reproducing and does so effectively.

 

Hyperforin
The most potent and most interesting anti-bacterial of all is Hyperforin, a component of St. John’s Wort. It is an extremely, extremely impressive anti-bacterial. It is effective at concentration as low as 100 ng/ml against Staph. This is considerably more potent than many pharmaceutical antibiotics — we’re talking 10-100 fold more (48). It has been shown effective at .1-1 ug/ml on numerous other bacterial species (49).

As ultra-potent as it is, it also works by an unusual mechanism, stimulating natural host defense reactions, such as enhancement of phagocyte functions and elimination of bacterial breakdown products that would otherwise promote virulence. For this reason, it is considered an extremely promising compound in situations of antibiotic resistance such as with MRSA and for AIDS patients (50).

 

Zingerone
Finally, we come to Zingerone, a component of ginger, which is not terribly potent on its own with an MIC of 1-2mM (51). Its value is as an adjunct ingredient, potentiating the effects of our other antibiotics, by interfering with several processes of bacterial growth and colonization.

It inhibits the formation of biofilms that allow bacteria to adhere to the cell wall and form a barrier that protects them from antibiotics and phagocytosis from the immune system (52). Further, it silences quorum sensing, the process by which bacteria release molecules signaling colonization when a sufficient density it achieved. It also reduces the production of numerous virulence factors which allow the pathogen to do such things attach to cell walls, move around, evade immunity, and derive nutrition from the host (53).

Basically, it just terrorizes them at all levels. Kills their livestock, poisons their wells, burns down their houses, and absconds with their children. In combination with a wide array of other antibiotics, it was found to decrease minimum inhibitory concentrations needed by 2 to 8-fold (54).

All in all, Shock Therapy™ gives you 5 highly effective natural anti-bacterials, working synergistically through just about every mechanism possible. Invasive, enemy combatant bacteria do not have a chance. But, just as antibiotics do not get rid of an infection on the first day, they won’t destroy the bad bacteria in your gut immediately.

But, not to worry, several ingredients in Shock Therapy™ also have properties which are immediately ameliorative and healing. So, they will already be providing relief and working on several fixes in the gut while the anti-bacterials are getting your renegade microbiota under control.

 

Immediate Action:

Ginsenosides
Ginsenosides are the primary active component of ginseng, the ethno-panacea used in traditional medicines for 100s of years. They have displayed potent antibacterial activity, themselves, or through metabolites such as 20(s)-protopanaxadiol, but that is not the primary reason for its inclusion (55-56).

It is of most importance as an adaptogen. Adaptogens regularizes bodily functions and relieves many ailments resulting from physiological stress. It puts things in balance and creates homeostasis. If the body is doing too much of something, it reduces it. If it is doing too little, it increases it. This category basically does not exist in the Western scientific literature and medicine, so I am not going to reference data. Its most well understood mechanism of action in the literature is being a potent, widespread anti-inflammatory.

Ginsenosides and their metabolites, such as Compound K, decrease an array inflammatory signals like TNF-a, IL1B, IL6, Cox-2, and iNOS while increasing anti-inflammatory IL10 (57, 58). They also specifically block LPS induced inflammatory pathways (59). We mentioned it previously, but you will hear much more about LPS in the SupraBiotic™ and Primer™ write-ups, as it is the molecular bridge between dysfunction of the gut and dysfunction of the body.

 

Zingerone
As mentioned, Zingerone is a component of ginger, which is well known for its use in aiding digestive issues such a nausea and stomach pain. Its method of action in this regard is an anti-inflammatory (60).

It inhibits the all-important LPS, as well as TNF-alpha, inflammatory interleukins, and COX-2 (61, 62). It also directly inhibits the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway (63). TLR-4 is another one you will hear a decent bit more about in the SupraBiotic™ and Primer™ write-ups, but recall that it links LPS inflammation with the reduced insulin and leptin sensitivity that results in the cascade of type 2 diabetes and dysfunction of hunger and appetite regulation in the brain.

Zingerone is also quite potent at PPAR-alpha being comparable to pharmaceutical fibrates (64). In addition to being anti-inflammatory, is a primary pathway of increased fatty acid oxidation. It works in conjunction with AMPK, which we will discuss more in a bit. And, yes, we will discuss both PPAR-alpha and AMPK in the SupraBiotic™ and Primer™ write-ups. PPAR-alpha and AMPK are basically the anti-LPS to TLR-4/CB1 pathway.

 

Hyperforin
Hyperforin is a super potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory, in addition to super potent anti-bacterial, with radical scavenging at less than 1uM – this is 100 times more potent than N-acetyl cysteine (65).

It suppresses inflammatory prostaglandin PGE(2) biosynthesis better than prescription NSAID indomethacin, as well as inflammatory 5-lipoxygenase end product formation comparably to the research standard 5-LO inhibitor zileuton (66). It suppressed COX-1 product 12(S)-hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid formation with about 3 fold more potency than aspirin, while being 18-fold more potent on 5-LO (67).

This is just a really cool and powerful compound in a lot of ways – and, most people probably just think of St. John’s Wort and components as anti-depressants. In any case, the efficacy of Hyperforin should make you happy.

 

Curcumin
Circumin is another anti-bacterial friend with anti-inflammatory benefits. It mediates its anti-inflammatory action through AMPK. In fact, it displays 400 times the potency of metformin, a Type-2 diabetes medication, with the well-known “side-effect” of fat loss (68).

AMPK is a primary signaler in the maintenance of tight junction integrity and intestinal barrier function. It is the one of the most important pathways in preventing the “leaky gut” we spoke of earlier in regard to LPS and other inflammatory and infectious molecules escaping into the body to wreak havoc (69, 70). Modern food processing and the Western diet are particular culprits in this pathology (71).

As we would expect from its super potency, it indeed protects against LPS-induced increases in production of inflammatory TNF-α, MIP-2, and IL-6, as well as tissue injury – and, it does so via AMPK activation (72). It reduces the levels of Toll-like Receptor-4 (the insulin and leptin sensitivity killer), while attenuating inflammation and symptoms of colitis (73).

So, there you have it.

Shock Therapy™ — a first of its kind product which aggressively attacks the genesis of microbiotic dysfunction, including digestive health, metabolic health, and body composition, while promptly and effectively addressing and repairing avenues where this dysfunction is made manifest. You will have immediate relief of symptoms as well as steady restoration of broken systems, while the bacterial culprits are destroyed, paving the way for SupraBiotic™ and Primer™ to completely transform your gut, your body, and your health.

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